CBT Therapy

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

A CBT counsellor will work with a client to identify unhelpful thoughts and patterns of behaviour and then support the client in learning techniques and strategies for making changes in their lives.

Practical devices such as negative thought diaries and other “homework” can be employed, helping clients to developing an understanding of the problems and their realisation that they can change their thoughts and behaviour – if they do it at a suitable pace – as they can take charge of their own behaviour.

CBT is a practical, talking therapy that has developed in popularity after research into its effectiveness was approved by NICE (National Institute for Health & Clinical Excellance).

The work is usually time-limited, and where used by BCPC, initial assessments and final reports of the work & progress can be provided.

Like most models of therapy it can be very effective in enabling change to take place.

Differences to other Therapeutic Models

Other more established therapeutic models have not subscribed to the RCT type of research used so have not received NICE’s universal `evidence based` approval.

The basis of CBT is that what people think can affect how they feel and how they behave. Clients will be encouraged to `make sense` of what is happening to them and practise doing it differently.

Other models will look more at the developing the quality & depth of the therapeutic relationships to work more with the feelings and develop personal psychological awareness. Therapists will also usually be required to be in therapy during their training (often not required in CBT training) to heighten their own self and inter personal awareness.

When they are stressed people think differently about themselves and what happens to them, often in a negative way, which can prolong and increase their stress.

BCPC Trauma Model

We use therapists who have trained in CBT or EMDR but also have a good in-depth Counselling or Psychotherapy training background & experience.